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illinois hardest hit program

illinois hardest hit program

Illinois Hardest Hit Program – Save Your Home – $25K Grant to Pay Mortgage Arrears

For anyone who hasn’t heard, here’s the news…there’s a new program on the block for saving your home.  And for some people, it’s a hit.

Looking for unbiased help in figuring out how to save your home?  Check out the following housing organizations. Click on the Link.  I have worked with all of them for years and know of their honesty and fair dealing:

The Illinois Hardest Hit Program essentially gets your home out of foreclosure.  Pays all the arrears, court costs, etc. to reinstate your loan fully and then provides up to 18 months of payment assistance.  The cap on the assistance is $25,000.

To apply for this program, please go to (click link):  Illinois Hardest Hit Program

Pro’s:

  • No Fees
  • Completely Reinstates Your Mortgage
  • Up to 18 months assistance

Con’s:

  • Increases the mortgage balance on your home by up to $25,000
  • Does not reduce the total amount owed on your home
  • Does not provide assistance after 18 months which is a problem if a person has not secured employment or their family is only partially employed

Who are the best candidates for this program:

  • Homeowners who are only temporarily out of work and can easily return to work in a stable job within 18 month of starting the program
  • Homeowners whose mortgage has less than $15,000 in arrears or is about 6 months or less behind
  • Homeowner who want to stay in their house for 10 years or more and does not care about having the flexibilty to move….for say a new job, changed family circumstances (divorce) or any other matter

Who are the worst candidates for this program:

  • Homeowners who haven’t made a mortgage payment for over one year
  • Homeowners who are in a profession that has been affected by the severe economic downturn such as construction or union jobs and are unlikely to have stable employment for the next five years
  • Homeowners who want the ability to be flexible in selling their home in the next 10 years

Who should consider a short sale of their home instead of this program:

  • Homeowners who cannot afford their home even when they are fully employed
  • Homeowners who are in an employment industry that will not recover soon and may need to relocate for employment
  • Homeowners who have so much debt on their home that they will not have equity for ten years or more (typically someone with two or more mortgages including a home equity line of credit)

Who should consider a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy instead of all of these options?

  • Homeowners who have unsecured debt (credit card style debt) that exceeds more than 1/3 of their annual take home pay
  • Homeowners who have not made a mortgage payment in over one year
  • Homeowners who have not been able to get a short sale approved by their lender
  • Homeowners who want to easily walk away from a home to simply move-on or need to relocate for employment
  • Homeowners who are insolvent – that is – no real assets outside of retirement accounts

When is a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Reorganization a  better than the Illinois Hardest Hit Program?

  • When a mortgage debt is more than 6 months in arrears (no payment for at least 6 months or longer
  • When the homeowners property has more than one mortgage such as a second mortgage or home equity line of credit
  • When the homeowner has equity or something valuable to save in the property but also has a large amount of unsecured debt (credit card style)
  • When the total home mortgage debt can be reduced through “stripping off the second and junior mortgages/liens”

Home Prices Take A Tumble In 2010 – Short Sales, Deeds In Lieu & Deficiency Judgments – NLO Nelson Law Office

Home Prices Take A Tumble In 2010 – Short Sales, Deeds In Lieu & Deficiency Judgments – NLO Nelson Law Office  It is hard to believe that between 1950 and 2008; home prices rarely climbed less than an average of 8% return.  In some years there might be no appreciation and in other years, double digit gains. The figures are hard to pin down, but if we can believe it, between 2009 and 2010 home prices in Chicago dropped 20%.  Think about it.  It’s crazy.  We’ve been told for years that these investments can’t fail and the prices never go down.  Do you remember the phrase – “better get in now before prices go up”.  The failed housing market or bubble burst has ruined realtors, loan officers and most importantly home owners who could barely afford and really weren’t qualified to buy a home.

Right now most experts believe foreclosure filings will peak in 2012 and decline thereafter.  Most experts are calling for another 15% drop in prices in this year with a flat period for many years thereafter.  What is troubling is the similarity between the great depression and our present situation.  Many people are chronically unemployed with no unemployment benefits and our government is surprisingly silent.

For our firm, we are seeing far less Chapter 7 bankruptcies where people are coming in with fees.  We think it is because people are heavily in debt, without income and just wanting to clean things up before they head back to work.  For most people it means waiting to file a Chapter 7 until just after you have been at a job for about 4 months.  This is about the lag time between starting a new job and garnishments catching up to you.

For people looking to avoid a bankruptcy but wanting to get out of their property, a short sale can be great.  The problem traditionally has been that lenders intentionally stalled to cause failures and force foreclosures.  Now, lenders are softening up as they find they can be more profitable in a short sale.  One thing you may have noticed,  nothing involved is done to benefit the borrower or preserve creditworthiness or home ownership – this is strictly an attempt to improve profitability.

A deed in lieu of foreclosure is where a borrower asks the lender to take back the property by allowing the owner to sign over the over property via deed and avoid having the bank file foreclosure.  In the old days, the property would often be sold by the bank at a price high enough to pay off the mortgage and the borrower simply walked away from a house he or she didn’t want.  Today,  lenders won’t even consider a deed in lieu unless you have failed to sell your home (for any price) for six months or sometimes a little less.   Often times, someone will buy the house as a short sale instead of having the bank take the house back through a deed in lieu.

What’s disturbing is that most borrowers face a deficiency judgment…. so what’s this.  Well, basically it’s like a credit card debt that often is $80,000 or more and most lenders SELL IT at 2 cents on the dollar to a collection agency that sues the borrower and garnishes their wages forever.  Does this sound bad?  Yes.  Unfortunately, this is exactly what is sending many good families into bankruptcy and I can’t think of a way that my clients can avoid it.

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code. CALL 877-GO-GO-NLO (877-464-6656) FOR A FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION TODAY! SATURDAY APPOINTMENTS ARE AVAILABLE.